What’s Blooming at Riveredge? An Updated Phenology Report

One of the fantastic Riveredge volunteers, who has been exploring Riveredge trails for years to both take photographs and record observations, is letting us know what she sees blooming at Riveredge. In scientific terms, this is called “Phenology.” What is phenology? It’s very similar to another word, phenomenon. Phenology means what happens, and when, in nature. Some of the most common examples are: when flowers are blooming, when buds are present, when specific migratory bird species return, when birds are nesting.

Chances are, you already notice phenology you just might not call it that. If you notice when your garden is blooming, when the trees are budding, or when butterflies return to the skies – you’re observing phenology! Read below to learn what you can find along the trails when you visit Riveredge Nature Center right now.

Wild Bergamot at Riveredge Nature Center

In Bloom

Bullhead Lily
Fragrant White Water Lily
Yarrow
Heal All
Pretty Bedstraw
Bergamot
Cowbane
Marsh Hedge Nettle
Hoary Vervain
Blue Giant Hyssop
Culver’s Root
Grey Headed Coneflower
Purple Prairie Clover
Prairie Dock
Canada Tick Trefoil
Flowering Spurge
Compass Plant
Orange Jewelweed
Wood Nettle
White Prairie Clover
Purple Coneflower
Agrimony
Dotted Mint
Rosinweed
Mad Dog Skullcap
Virginia Mountain Mint
Evening Primrose
Cup Plant
Whorled Milkweed
Gayfeather
Nodding Wild Onion
Spotted Joe Pye Weed
Rattlesnake Master
Carpenter’s Square Figwort
Canada Goldenrod
Small Purple Fringed Orchid
Clustered Poppy Mallow
Sawtooth Sunflower
Purple Joe Pye Weed
Wild Cucumber
Large leaved Aster
Stinging Nettle
White Snakeroot
Hog Peanut
Great Blue Lobelia
Ironweed
Common Boneset
White Wood Aster
Showy Blazing Star
Rough Blazing Star
Guara
Wild Senna
Round Headed Bush Clover
Canada Milk Vetch
Virgin’s Bower
Indian Pipe
Swamp Lousewort
Swamp Thistle
Green Headed Coneflower
Branched Coneflower
Obedience

Flowers In Bud

Grass of Parnassus
False Boneset

What’s Blooming at Riveredge? An Updated Phenology Report

One of the fantastic Riveredge volunteers, who has been exploring Riveredge trails for years to both take photographs and record observations, is letting us know what she sees blooming at Riveredge. In scientific terms, this is called “Phenology.” What is phenology? It’s very similar to another word, phenomenon. Phenology means what happens, and when, in nature. Some of the most common examples are: when flowers are blooming, when buds are present, when specific migratory bird species return, when birds are nesting.

Chances are, you already notice phenology you just might not call it that. If you notice when your garden is blooming, when the trees are budding, or when butterflies return to the skies – you’re observing phenology! Read below to learn what you can find along the trails when you visit Riveredge Nature Center right now.

Butterfly-weed blooming at Riveredge Nature Center

Butterfly-weed blooming at Riveredge Nature Center.

In Bloom

Bull Head Lily
Bladderwort
Fragrant White Water Lily
Hoary Alyssum
Yarrow
Spreading Dogbane
Heal All
Black Eyed Susan
Enchanter’s Nightshade
Wild Leek
Fringed Loosestrife
Butterfly Weed
Indian Hemp
Rough Fruited Cinquefoil
Bergamot
Queen of the Prairie
Cowbane
Marsh Hedge Nettle
Pointed Leaved Tick Trefoil
Shrubby St John’s Wort
Hoary Vervain
Blue Giant Hyssop
Lead Plant
Culver’s Root
Grey Headed Coneflower
Purple Prairie Clover
Prairie Dock
Canada Tick Trefoil
Flowering Spurge
Compass Plant
Orange Jewelweed
Wood Nettle
Pickerel Weed
White Prairie Clover
Wild Petunia
Purple Coneflower
Agrimony
Lopseed
Dotted Mint
Rosinweed
Virginia Mountain Mint
Cup Plant
Whorled Milkweed
Gayfeather
Nodding Wild Onion
Starry Campion
Spotted Joe Pye Weed
Blue Vervain
Rattlesnake Master
Carpenter’s Square Figwort
Canada Goldenrod
Small Purple Fringed Orchid
Clustered Poppy Mallow

Pink Plumes of Queen of the Prairie at Riveredge.

Flowers In Bud

Large Leaved Aster
Showy Blazing Star

What’s Blooming at Riveredge? An Updated Phenology Report

One of the fantastic Riveredge volunteers, who has been exploring Riveredge trails for years to both take photographs and record observations, is letting us know what she sees blooming at Riveredge. In scientific terms, this is called “Phenology.” What is phenology? It’s very similar to another word, phenomenon. Phenology means what happens, and when, in nature. Some of the most common examples are: when flowers are blooming, when buds are present, when specific migratory bird species return, when birds are nesting.

Chances are, you already notice phenology you just might not call it that. If you notice when your garden is blooming, when the trees are budding, or when butterflies return to the skies – you’re observing phenology! Read below to learn what you can find along the trails when you visit Riveredge Nature Center right now.

Turk’s Cap Lily in the sunshine.

In Bloom

Bladderwort
Fragrant White Water Lily
Hoary Alyssum
Yarrow
Spreading Dogbane
Pale Purple Coneflower
Harebell
Heal All
Black Eyed Susan
Wild Quinine
False Sunflower
Enchanter’s Nightshade
Wild Leek
Fringed Loosestrife
Butterfly Weed
Indian Hemp
Common Milkweed
Rough Fruited Cinquefoil
Bergamot
Turk’s Cap Lily
Queen of the Prairie
Cowbane
Marsh Hedge Nettle
Pointed Leaved Tick Trefoil
Shrubby St. John’s Wort
Hoary Vervain
Blue Giant Hyssop
Swamp Milkweed
Lead Plant
Culver’s Root
Grey Headed Coneflower
Purple Prairie Clover
Canada Tick Trefoil
Flowering Spurge
Compass Plant
Orange Jewelweed
Wood Nettle
Pickerel Weed
Tuberous Indian Plantain
White Prairie Clover
Purple Coneflower
Agrimony
Lopseed
Dotted Mint
Rosinweed
Mad Dog Skullcap
Virginia Mountain Mint
Evening Primrose
Cup Plant
Whorled Milkweed
Gayfeather
Nodding Wild Onion
Starry Campion

What’s Blooming at Riveredge? An Updated Phenology Report

One of the fantastic Riveredge volunteers, who has been exploring Riveredge trails for years to both take photographs and record observations, is letting us know what she sees blooming at Riveredge. In scientific terms, this is called “Phenology.” What is phenology? It’s very similar to another word, phenomenon. Phenology means what happens, and when, in nature. Some of the most common examples are: when flowers are blooming, when buds are present, when specific migratory bird species return, when birds are nesting.

Chances are, you already notice phenology you just might not call it that. If you notice when your garden is blooming, when the trees are budding, or when butterflies return to the skies – you’re observing phenology! Read below to learn what you can find along the trails when you visit Riveredge Nature Center right now.

Black-eyed Susan at Riveredge Nature Center

In Bloom

Lyre leaved Rock Cress
Wild Columbine
Bullhead Lily
Bladderwort
Prairie Phlox
Canada Anemone
Angelica
Tall Meadow Rue
Fragrant White Water Lily
Spiderwort
Lance Leaved Coreopsis
Hairy Beardtongue
Blue Wild Indigo
White Wild Indigo
Hoary Alyssum
Yarrow
Prairie Golden Aster
Bluets
Alumroot
Black Snakeroot
Cow Parsnip
Wild Garlic
Spreading Dogbane
Pale Purple Coneflower
Tall Beardtongue
White Beardtongue
Poke Milkweed
Harebell
Healall
Pale Spike Lobelia
Black Eyed Susan
Wild Quinine
Wild Four O’Clock
False Sunflower
Enchanter’s Nightshade
Wild Leek
Fringed Loosestrife
Marsh Phlox
Butterfly Weed
Pretty Bedstraw
Indian Hemp
Common Milkweed
Downy Wood Mint

Purple Coneflowers at Riveredge Nature Center

Flowers In Bud

Prairie Dock
Rattlesnake Master
Purple Coneflower
Sweet Joe Pye Weed

Volunteer Spotlight: Curiosity Driven by Community, Flowers, and Phenology

Pat Fairchild has been a volunteer for more than 15 years at Riveredge. Back then, she was seeking a flexible volunteering opportunity that worked with her hectic work schedule. The Tuesday Habitat Healer crew was the perfect fit. Whenever able, she’d show up to plant seedlings, snip invasive species, or help with other outdoor conservation work.

Curiosity Leads to New Knowledge and Skills

In order to learn about the flora she saw, Pat asked a lot of questions from fellow volunteers and staff members. “Everyone is so helpful and generous with their diverse knowledge,” says Pat. Being a visual learner, she started photocopying pictures of the species she saw blooming along the trails and posting the pictures on the Visitor’s Center wall for others to learn from as well. But one day a copy store employee told her that wasn’t allowed due to copyright…even if it was for educational purposes. So Pat bought a camera and began shooting and developing her own photographs to post on the wall.

While the Visitor’s Center was closed in spring due to Covid-19 concerns, Pat continued her weekly wildflower walks and we’ve been posting her phenological flower observations to the Riveredge Blog. “It’s great – I get out of the house, see the flowers and get some exercise. I’m a person who needs a purpose…I don’t just go out walking for no reason,” says Pat. “The flowers help me have a reason to get outdoors.”

Connection to Community and the Land

In addition to being a Habitat Healer, Pat has also been an interpretive naturalist and helps us raise Lake Sturgeon. Additionally, Pat also makes the time to volunteer with Interfaith, the American Cancer Society, and the Saukville Community Food Pantry.

The combination of community and love for the land is what keeps Pat coming back to Riveredge. “There are so many volunteers at Riveredge who have dedicated so much time and effort to making this place what it is – some of the people who started this place are still involved!” Pat says. “This land gets in your bones,” she smiles, “And you keep coming back.”

What’s Blooming at Riveredge? An Updated Phenology Report

One of the fantastic Riveredge volunteers, who has been exploring Riveredge trails for years to both take photographs and record observations, is letting us know what she sees blooming at Riveredge. In scientific terms, this is called “Phenology.” What is phenology? It’s very similar to another word, phenomenon. Phenology means what happens, and when, in nature. Some of the most common examples are: when flowers are blooming, when buds are present, when specific migratory bird species return, when birds are nesting.

Chances are, you already notice phenology you just might not call it that. If you notice when your garden is blooming, when the trees are budding, or when butterflies return to the skies – you’re observing phenology! Read below to learn what you can find along the trails when you visit Riveredge Nature Center right now.

Spiderwort can be seen throughout Riveredge prairies.

In Bloom

Stoneseed
Bullhead Lily
Blue Flag Iris
Bladderwort
Canada Anemone
Angelica
Tall Meadow Rue
Fragrant White Water Lily
Spiderwort
Lance Leaved Coreopsis
Hairy Beardtongue
Blue Wild Indigo
White Wild Indigo
Hoary Alyssum
Yarrow
Prairie Golden Aster
Bluets
Alumroot
Common Cinquefoil
Cow Parsnip
Large Flowered Beardtongue
Wild Garlic
Spreading Dogbane
Northern Bedstraw
Pale Purple Coneflower
Tall Beardtongue
White Avens
Poke Milkweed
Harebell
Heal All
Pale Spike Lobelia
Black Eyed Susan
Wild Quinine
Wild Four O’Clock

Pale Purple Coneflower

Flower in Bud

Wild Leek

Nature is Resilient, Yet it Needs Your Help. Support Riveredge Today!

Dear Riveredge Family,

During uncertain times, nature remains a constant and reliable friend. From all of us at Riveredge, we hope this message finds you healthy and adjusting to life in this new, temporary “normal.”

We know that nature can help provide a respite from the uncertainty around us. And, right now, Riveredge, as a caregiver of nature, needs your help.

There are so many ways that these unprecedented realities are impacting, and will continue to impact, our families, communities, education systems, businesses, and the overall economy.

As many of you know, we’ve had to cancel events, programs, and field trips for the foreseeable future. As a non-profit organization, Riveredge relies on charitable donations as well as revenue from educational programs and events in order to support our mission. Without the option of hosting our beloved community events and programs as planned, the need for philanthropic support is more important now than at any time in the past decade (possibly longer).

Yet, we are working hard to ensure that community access to Riveredge’s 10 miles of trails and restorative benefits to our physical and mental health remain open and available. To do this, we need your help.

If you are financially able, we are asking you to consider a one-time gift to support Riveredge during these unprecedented times.

100% of your support will be used to continue the important, mission-driven work of Riveredge and keep the trails open. Please join us in continuing to connect families, schools, and communities to the benefits of the natural world around them. If we come together during times of uncertainty, we will come out on the other side stronger than ever before.

The Riveredge family has always been strong. From the beginning, Riveredge’s founders have been finding creative and innovative ways to bring the magic of this special place to so many people throughout the region, furthering the ripple effect, and inspiring the next generation of environmental stewards. Nature is resilient and so is the Riveredge spirit!

Here at Riveredge, the maple sap has continued to flow, the spring flowers are continuing to emerge, and the birds are continuing to return from their far-away wintering grounds.

We invite your solidarity as fellow nature-lovers and caretakers of this special place.

In gratitude,

Jessica Jens,

Riveredge Executive Director

Natalie Dorrler

Riveredge Director of Development

 

 

Member Guide to Winter at Riveredge

Trail Update January 30, 2020

With Sunday night snow our trails are in fantastic shape! Come visit for an adventure with your skis or snowshoes – we also have snowshoes for rent. All Access Riveredge members are able to check out snowshoes for free! Join us for our Friday Night Candle-lit Hike.

Winter Trails

Winter provides exciting exploration opportunities, as some of the vulnerable trail areas that are otherwise off-limits to foot trafffic are able to be explored once the ground is frozen (see trail map below). We ask that anyone wearing boots or snowshoes walk on either side of identified ski trails in wintertime. Our trails are plenty wide, offering space for everyone to explore in their preferred manner. Trail conditions  are checked by Riveredge staff on a regular basis. Consult the Visitor’s Center for suggested trails and current snow conditions.

Checking out Snowshoes

At Riveredge, snowshoes are free for All Access Members to checkout for use on the Riveredge property and are able to be checked out when we have in excess of 6 inches of new fluffy snow or 4 inches of packed snow. Without sufficient snow, snowshoes will be damaged by digging into the gravel beneath the snow (plus it would probably be easier in boots anyway). Snowshoes are checked out on a first come, first served basis, and can be reserved ahead of time for events. Please affix snowshoes to your boots outside at the head of the trail; do not walk in snowshoes indoors or on brick, gravel, or wooden structures such as the back deck as this damages both the surface and the snowshoes. Snowshoes are available for checkout and must be returned before the building closes and for special events when the building is open (such as Friday Night Candle-lit Hikes).

Pop Up Hours

The Riveredge Visitor Center is generally closed on Saturdays and Sundays in winter, however if we have a decent snowfall and anticipate people having interest in checking out snowshoes, we will have weekend pop-up hours in the Visitor Center.

Winter Trail Map