What’s Blooming at Riveredge? An Updated Phenology Report

One of the fantastic Riveredge volunteers, who has been exploring Riveredge trails for years to both take photographs and record observations, is letting us know what she sees blooming at Riveredge. In scientific terms, this is called “Phenology.” What is phenology? It’s very similar to another word, phenomenon. Phenology means what happens, and when, in nature. Some of the most common examples are: when flowers are blooming, when buds are present, when specific migratory bird species return, when birds are nesting.

Chances are, you already notice phenology you just might not call it that. If you notice when your garden is blooming, when the trees are budding, or when butterflies return to the skies – you’re observing phenology! Read below to learn what you can find along the trails when you visit Riveredge Nature Center right now.

Black-eyed Susan at Riveredge Nature Center

In Bloom

Lyre leaved Rock Cress
Wild Columbine
Bullhead Lily
Bladderwort
Prairie Phlox
Canada Anemone
Angelica
Tall Meadow Rue
Fragrant White Water Lily
Spiderwort
Lance Leaved Coreopsis
Hairy Beardtongue
Blue Wild Indigo
White Wild Indigo
Hoary Alyssum
Yarrow
Prairie Golden Aster
Bluets
Alumroot
Black Snakeroot
Cow Parsnip
Wild Garlic
Spreading Dogbane
Pale Purple Coneflower
Tall Beardtongue
White Beardtongue
Poke Milkweed
Harebell
Healall
Pale Spike Lobelia
Black Eyed Susan
Wild Quinine
Wild Four O’Clock
False Sunflower
Enchanter’s Nightshade
Wild Leek
Fringed Loosestrife
Marsh Phlox
Butterfly Weed
Pretty Bedstraw
Indian Hemp
Common Milkweed
Downy Wood Mint

Purple Coneflowers at Riveredge Nature Center

Flowers In Bud

Prairie Dock
Rattlesnake Master
Purple Coneflower
Sweet Joe Pye Weed

Volunteer Spotlight: Curiosity Driven by Community, Flowers, and Phenology

Pat Fairchild has been a volunteer for more than 15 years at Riveredge. Back then, she was seeking a flexible volunteering opportunity that worked with her hectic work schedule. The Tuesday Habitat Healer crew was the perfect fit. Whenever able, she’d show up to plant seedlings, snip invasive species, or help with other outdoor conservation work.

Curiosity Leads to New Knowledge and Skills

In order to learn about the flora she saw, Pat asked a lot of questions from fellow volunteers and staff members. “Everyone is so helpful and generous with their diverse knowledge,” says Pat. Being a visual learner, she started photocopying pictures of the species she saw blooming along the trails and posting the pictures on the Visitor’s Center wall for others to learn from as well. But one day a copy store employee told her that wasn’t allowed due to copyright…even if it was for educational purposes. So Pat bought a camera and began shooting and developing her own photographs to post on the wall.

While the Visitor’s Center was closed in spring due to Covid-19 concerns, Pat continued her weekly wildflower walks and we’ve been posting her phenological flower observations to the Riveredge Blog. “It’s great – I get out of the house, see the flowers and get some exercise. I’m a person who needs a purpose…I don’t just go out walking for no reason,” says Pat. “The flowers help me have a reason to get outdoors.”

Connection to Community and the Land

In addition to being a Habitat Healer, Pat has also been an interpretive naturalist and helps us raise Lake Sturgeon. Additionally, Pat also makes the time to volunteer with Interfaith, the American Cancer Society, and the Saukville Community Food Pantry.

The combination of community and love for the land is what keeps Pat coming back to Riveredge. “There are so many volunteers at Riveredge who have dedicated so much time and effort to making this place what it is – some of the people who started this place are still involved!” Pat says. “This land gets in your bones,” she smiles, “And you keep coming back.”

Hidden Summer Gems to Explore at Riveredge

With 379 acres and 10 miles of trails, Riveredge Nature Center has so many ever-changing beautiful places to see and experience throughout the year. Here are a few of our favorite summer places to explore.

Prehistoric Fern Fantasy Land

Step back into the time of the dinosaurs and experience the ferns lining the trail near the Milwaukee River. They grow so dense in early summer that it can play tricks on the eyes; so plentiful that the tessellated greenscape can appear surreal. Rather than flowers and seeds, ferns reproduce by sending out spores. Early in the season they unfurl fronds in a shape known as “fiddleheads.” Later in the season, ferns dry and senesce to look like brown fossils standing out of the earth, testaments to both an earlier time and an earlier season.

Flowers and Insects in the Summertime Prairie

Summer is that time when the prairie really sings, both figuratively and literally. A menagerie of insects and birds flit, buzz, and hover from bloom to branch. From the yellow explosion of Coreopsis, to the wispy scarlet of Prairie Smoke, and the feathery pinks of Queen of the Prairie, a stunning cascade blooms throughout the warm months.

  Larsen Climbing Rocks

What could be more natural to a Riveredge Kid than climbing? The Larsen Climbing Rocks are the perfect place for kids of every age to explore, practice gross motor skills and balance, Conveniently located just past the Yurts, a good rock crawl is the perfect start to any trail jaunt.

The Calm of Riveredge Creek

Many people might not know, but portions of Riveredge Nature Center are a designated State Natural Area, which denotes a high quality habitat. Riveredge Creek winds through this section. Intersections where the trail crosses Riveredge Creek are perfect locations to feel the cool shade beneath cedars and immerse in the tranquil sounds of a burbling creek while listening to the calls and wing flaps of nearby birds.

Visit Riveredge today to discover your favorite spots!

What’s Blooming at Riveredge? An Updated Phenology Report

One of the fantastic Riveredge volunteers, who has been exploring Riveredge trails for years to both take photographs and record observations, is letting us know what she sees blooming at Riveredge. In scientific terms, this is called “Phenology.” What is phenology? It’s very similar to another word, phenomenon. Phenology means what happens, and when, in nature. Some of the most common examples are: when flowers are blooming, when buds are present, when specific migratory bird species return, when birds are nesting.

Chances are, you already notice phenology you just might not call it that. If you notice when your garden is blooming, when the trees are budding, or when butterflies return to the skies – you’re observing phenology! Read below to learn what you can find along the trails when you visit Riveredge Nature Center right now.

Spiderwort can be seen throughout Riveredge prairies.

In Bloom

Stoneseed
Bullhead Lily
Blue Flag Iris
Bladderwort
Canada Anemone
Angelica
Tall Meadow Rue
Fragrant White Water Lily
Spiderwort
Lance Leaved Coreopsis
Hairy Beardtongue
Blue Wild Indigo
White Wild Indigo
Hoary Alyssum
Yarrow
Prairie Golden Aster
Bluets
Alumroot
Common Cinquefoil
Cow Parsnip
Large Flowered Beardtongue
Wild Garlic
Spreading Dogbane
Northern Bedstraw
Pale Purple Coneflower
Tall Beardtongue
White Avens
Poke Milkweed
Harebell
Heal All
Pale Spike Lobelia
Black Eyed Susan
Wild Quinine
Wild Four O’Clock

Pale Purple Coneflower

Flower in Bud

Wild Leek

What’s Blooming at Riveredge? An Updated Phenology Report

One of the fantastic Riveredge volunteers, who has been exploring Riveredge trails for years to both take photographs and record observations, is letting us know what she sees blooming at Riveredge. In scientific terms, this is called “Phenology.” What is phenology? It’s very similar to another word, phenomenon. Phenology means what happens, and when, in nature. Some of the most common examples are: when flowers are blooming, when buds are present, when specific migratory bird species return, when birds are nesting.

Chances are, you already notice phenology you just might not call it that. If you notice when your garden is blooming, when the trees are budding, or when butterflies return to the skies – you’re observing phenology! Read below to learn what you can find along the trails when you visit Riveredge Nature Center right now. A notation of -P means that the flower has moved past peak bloom stage.

Jack in the Pulpit

Blooming

False Rue Anemone
Blue Violet
Wild Ginger
Prairie Smoke
Swamp Buttercup
Jack in the Pulpit
Kidney Leaved Buttercup
Wood Betony
Hoary Puccoon
Wild Blue Phlox
Miterwort
Early Meadow Rue
Heart Leaved Golden Alexander
Wild Geranium
Gooseberry
Cleaver’s Bedstraw
Lyre leaved Rock Cress
Wild Columbine
Kitten Tails
Golden Alexander
Thyme leaved Speedwell
Mayapple
Bastard Toadflax
Red Baneberry
Grove Sandwort
Stoneseed
Cursed Crowfoot
Robin’s Plantain
Wild Lily of the Valley
Tower Mustard
Solomon’s Seal
Small Yellow Lady’s Slipper
Wild Strawberry
Shooting Stars
Blue Eyed Grass
Cream Wild Indigo
False Solomon’s Seal
Dwarf Ginseng
Fringed Puccoon
White Baneberry
Virginia Waterleaf
Yellow Pimpernel
Bullhead Lily
Blue Flag Iris
Bladderwort
Sweet Cicely
Swamp Saxifrage
Golden Ragwort
Prairie Phlox

Prairie Smoke at Riveredge Nature Center

Prairie Smoke

Flower Buds Present

Giant Solomon’s Seal
Tall Meadow Rue
Lance Leaved Coreopsis
Feverwort

Lance-leaved Coreopsis

Sprouting/Leaves Present

Lead Plant
Purple Joe Pye Weed
Hog Peanut
Poke Milkweed
White Sage

What’s Blooming at Riveredge? An Updated Phenology Report

One of the fantastic Riveredge volunteers, who has been exploring Riveredge trails for years to both take photographs and record observations, is letting us know what she sees blooming at Riveredge. In scientific terms, this is called “Phenology.” What is phenology? It’s very similar to another word, phenomenon. Phenology means what happens, and when, in nature. Some of the most common examples are: when flowers are blooming, when buds are present, when specific migratory bird species return, when birds are nesting.

Chances are, you already notice phenology you just might not call it that. If you notice when your garden is blooming, when the trees are budding, or when butterflies return to the skies – you’re observing phenology! Read below to learn what you can find along the trails when you visit Riveredge Nature Center right now. A notation of -P means that the flower has moved past peak bloom stage.

Wild Ginger flowers can be a challenge to find, generally hidden beneath large, heart-shaped leaves.

Blooming

False Rue Anemone
Dutchman’s Breeches
Marsh Marigold
Blue Violet
Spring Cress
Wild Ginger
Wood Anemone
Prairie Smoke
Swamp Buttercup
Large Flowered Trillium
Jack in the Pulpit-P
Blue Cohosh
Downy Yellow Violet
Kidney Leaved Buttercup
Wood Betony
Hoary Puccoon
Wild Blue Phlox -P
Miterwort
Bellwort
Pussy Toes
Nodding Trillium
Early Meadow Rue
Heart leaved Golden Alexander
Wild Geranium – P
Gooseberry
Common Valerian
Cleaver’s Bedstraw
Goldenseal
Lyre leaved Rock Cress – P
Wild Columbine
Kitten Tails
Golden Alexander
Jacob’s Ladder-P
Red Trillium
Starry False Solomon’s Seal
Thyme leaved Speedwell
Mayapple -P
Bastard Toadflax -P
Red Baneberry
Grove Sandwort
Stoneseed
Cursed Crowfoot
Robin’s Plantain
Wild Lily of the Valley
Tower Mustard
Solomon’s Seal
Small Yellow Lady’s Slipper -P
Wild Strawberry
Shooting Star -P
Blue Eyed Grass
Cream Wild Indigo
False Solomon’s Seal
Dwarf Ginseng-P
Star Flower
Fringed Puccoon -P

Mayapple flowers are hidden beneath those great big leaves.

In Bud

Wild Garlic
Yellow Pimpernel
Yarrow
Prairie Phlox
Blue Wild Indigo

The aptly named Pussy Toes, look akin to a soft, fuzzy feline foot atop a stem.

Sprouting/Leaves Present

Common Milkweed
Large leaved Aster
Stiff Goldenrod
Carrion Flower
Zig Zag Goldenrod
Jewelweed
Wild Quinine
Poison Ivy

What’s Blooming at Riveredge? An Updated Phenology Report

One of the fantastic Riveredge volunteers, who has been exploring Riveredge trails for years to both take photographs and record observations, is letting us know what she sees blooming at Riveredge. In scientific terms, this is called “Phenology.” What is phenology? It’s very similar to another word, phenomenon. Phenology means what happens, and when, in nature. Some of the most common examples are: when flowers are blooming, when buds are present, when specific migratory bird species return, when birds are nesting.

Chances are, you already notice phenology you just might not call it that. If you notice when your garden is blooming, when the trees are budding, or when butterflies return to the skies – you’re observing phenology! Read below to learn what you can find along the trails when you visit Riveredge Nature Center right now.

False Rue Anemone

False Rue Anemone

Blooming

Penn Sedge
Spring Beauty
False Rue Anemone
Dutchman’s Breeches
Marsh Marigold
Blue Violet
Spring Beauty
Wild Ginger
Wood Anemone
Prairie Smoke
Swamp Buttercup
Prairie Buttercup
Large Flowered Trillium
Jack in the Pulpit -P
Blue Cohosh – P
Downy Yellow Violet
Kidney Leaved Buttercup
Wood Betony
Hoary Puccoon
Wild Blue Phlox
Miterwort
Bellwort
Pussy Toes
Nodding Trillium
Early Meadow Rue
Heart Leaved Golden Alexander
Wild Geranium
Gooseberry
Common Valerian
Cleaver’s Bedstraw
Goldenseal
Lyre Leaved Rock Cress
Wild Columbine
Kitten Tails
Golden Alexander
Jacob’s Ladder
Red Trillium
Starry False Solomon’s Seal

Virginia Waterleaf at Riveredge Nature Center

Virginia Waterleaf

Flower Buds Present

Virginia Waterleaf

Pale Purple Coneflower

Sprouting/leaves Present

Stoneseed
Swamp Lousewort
Prairie Dock
Pale Purple Coneflower

What’s Blooming at Riveredge? An Updated Phenology Report

One of the fantastic Riveredge volunteers, who has been exploring Riveredge trails for years to both take photographs and record observations, is letting us know what she sees blooming at Riveredge. In scientific terms, this is called “Phenology.” What is phenology? It’s very similar to another word, phenomenon. Phenology means what happens, and when, in nature. Some of the most common examples are: when flowers are blooming, when buds are present, when specific migratory bird species return, when birds are nesting.

Chances are, you already notice phenology you just might not call it that. If you notice when your garden is blooming, when the trees are budding, or when butterflies return to the skies – you’re observing phenology! Read below to learn what you can find along the trails when you visit Riveredge Nature Center right now.

Prairie Smoke

Prairie Smoke

Blooming

Penn Sedge
Bloodroot
Hepatica
Spring Beauty
False Rue Anemone
Cut Leaved Toothwort
Dutchman’s Breeches
Marsh Marigold
White Trout Lily
Blue Violet
Spring Cress
Wild Ginger
Wood Anemone
Prairie Smoke
Swamp Buttercup
Prairie Buttercup
Large Flowered Trillium
Jack in the Pulpit
Blue Cohosh
Downy Yellow Violet
Kidney Leaved Buttercup
Wood Betony
Hoary Puccoon
Wild Blue Phlox
Miterwort
Bellwort

Wild Columbine

Wild Columbine

In Bud

Nodding Trillium
Wild Lily of the Valley
Golden Alexander
Wild Columbine
False Solomon’s Seal

Golden Alexander

Sprouting/Leaves Present

Cow Parsnip
Bedstraws
Goldenseal
Blue Giant Hyssop

What’s Blooming at Riveredge? An Updated Phenology Report

One of the fantastic Riveredge volunteers, who has been exploring Riveredge trails for years to both take photographs and record observations, is letting us know what she sees blooming at Riveredge. In scientific terms, this is called “Phenology.” What is phenology? It’s very similar to another word, phenomenon. Phenology means what happens, and when, in nature. Some of the most common examples are: when flowers are blooming, when buds are present, when specific migratory bird species return, when birds are nesting.

Chances are, you already notice phenology you just might not call it that. If you notice when your garden is blooming, when the trees are budding, or when butterflies return to the skies – you’re observing phenology! Read below to learn what you can find along the trails when you visit Riveredge Nature Center right now.

In Bloom

Trout Lily

Trout Lily is easily identified by the speckled leaves.

Pasque Flower
Penn Sedge
Bloodroot
Hepatica
Spring Beauty
False Rue Anemone
Cut Leaved  Toothwort
Dutchman’s Breeches
Marsh Marigold
Leatherwood
White Trout Lily
Blue Violet
Spring Cress
Wild Ginger
Wood Anemone
Prairie Smoke
Swamp Buttercup
Prairie Buttercup
Large Flowered Trillium

In Bud

Prairie Shooting Star

Prairie Shooting Star

Bastard  Toadflax
Blue Cohosh
Wood Betony
Draba
Kidney Leaved Buttercup
Wild Blue Phlox
Dwarf Ginseng
Jacob’s Ladder
Heart Leaved  Golden Alexander
Shooting Star

Sprouting/Leaves Present

Early Meadow Rue
Bellwort
False Solomon’s Seal

Riveredge No Dogs or Pets Policy Explained

So many new people have been visiting Riveredge Nature Center lately, and that’s wonderful! Unfortunately, we may not have always done the best job of explaining our no dogs or pets policy at Riveredge.

In this video, the Riveredge Research & Conservation Manager explains why Riveredge is such a special habitat for native and migratory wildlife, animals that don’t have another home or backyard to return to, and why we therefore do not allow dogs or other pets on the property, as domesticated animals can be disruptive to these sensitive habitats.

Please join us in embracing Riveredge as a sanctuary for these unique and often uncommon plants and animals, and help us spread the word that Riveredge is a sanctuary for wildlife; not domesticated pets.

If you’d like to explore outdoors with dogs, you’re in luck as dozens of locations exist in the immediate area where one can bring dogs outdoors. Parks in Ozaukee County, Washington County, Wisconsin, and Sheboygan, Wisconsin welcome leashed dogs. Please see this list for locations to bring dogs outdoors:

Ozaukee County

Covered Bridge Park, Ehlers Park, Lion’s Den Gorge Nature Preserve, Hawthorne Hills Park, Mee-Kwon Park, River Oaks Park, Tendick Nature Park, Virmond Park, Waubedonia Park, Ozaukee Interurban Trail.

Washington County

Ackerman’s Grove County Park Family Park, Glacier Hills County Park, Goeden County Park, Heritage Trails County Park, Homestead Hollow County Park (includes off-leash exercise area), Leonard J. Yahr County Park, Lizard Mound County Park, Sandy Knoll County Park.

Sheboygan County

Broughton Sheboygan Marsh Park & Campground, Taylor Park, Esslingen Park, Roy Sebald Sheboygan River Natural Area, Gerber Lake Wildlife Area, Amsterdam Dunes Preservation Area